Our Story

Restless Beings formed in 2008. We are an international human rights organisation and registered UK charity dedicated to supporting the world’s most marginalised communities through advocacy, activism and holistic charitable projects. A voice for the voiceless, silenced and oppressed. We occupy the space between human rights advocacy (academia, policy, media) and humanitarian response (relief/aid, programmes). We believe this approach is key to affecting real change.

We are a committed, organised and passionate group of activists' - thinkers and doers with one mission which is to shed light on the struggles of persecuted communities and do everything within our means and resources to bring about a sustainable, tangible and meaningful difference. This is our mission and we do this by understanding, addressing and challenging the roots of the human rights issues faced by the communities we work with. With our ethos of grassroots change, we work in direct partnership with the communities and ensure our support is consultative and holistic.

Our vision is to see a balanced world where marginalised voices are heard, and the communities have better access to their rights - as outlined by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. For many, having faced unimaginable violence, poverty and neglect, these basic rights, freedoms and pathways to justice is nothing short of a dream. Our work is centred on making this a reality. We are driven by an unshakeable faith in collective power and collaboration to make these changes - because together we are truly stronger.

How can you help?

Keep in touch and find out about how you can support. Be it a demonstration, fundraising, attending one of our events, signing a petition, or telling your friends and family. Shout, march, donate, discuss – with us. Get in touch :)

Our Projects

Through persistent campaigning and raising awareness of the plight of the communities at the heart of our work, we are able to mobilise civil society, media, academic institutions, NGO’s and government bodies. The positive changes and measured impact from our projects are a direct result of our supporters’ and partners' trust in our advocacy.

Street Children of Dhaka, Bangladesh

Street children are one of the world’s most invisible populations, overlooked by governments, law and policymakers and many others in society. It is estimated that there are more than 680,000 street children living in Bangladesh with at least 75% of them living in the nation's capital, Dhaka.

  • We work with local changemakers, civil society and the government to improve the quality of children’s lives and their access to education, healthcare, shelter and safe employment opportunities.
  • The children are continually facing the dangers of drugs, sexual exploitation and trafficking and we work towards addressing each of these issues in the most holistic way possible.
  • We have worked with over 400 children assisting them from transitioning away from a life of drugs, abuse and petty crime.
  • Established an initial Rehabilitation Centre for child users of Dandy, a local drug made of alcohol and glue.
  • Currently fundraising for creation of a sustainable village made for Street Children to offer pathways away from abuse and into safety and potential.

Rohingya Rights, Burma & South/Southeast Asia

We are one of the leading international organisations campaigning for the rights of the persecuted Rohingya community. The Rohingya have been facing a slow genocide orchestrated by the Burmese military junta for decades. We were one of the first to bring verified news and pictures of the suffering to the world via our longstanding contacts and work in the region. Our work helped bring the very first and exclusive reports to CNN, BBC, Channel 4, AFP and more during the 2012 crisis.

  • We have directly supported over 100,000 Rohingya by providing temporary shelter on their arrival to the Bangladesh/Myanmar border.
  • We have distributed over 600 tonnes of aid since 2017.
  • Over the past decade, we have made multiple policy recommendations to governments worldwide, consulted with NGOs and INGOs to ensure the support given to the Rohingya is dignified and partnered with think tanks for a number of vital research projects which directly impact the wellbeing of the Rohingya.
  • We are currently running children’s and women’s safe spaces and learning centres inside the camps which work towards providing much needed support in the form of counselling for rape victims, PTSD therapy, creative programmes and beyond.
  • We have provided and continue to provide policy advice to the British Parliament through the All Party Parliamentary Groups on Burma, Bangladesh, Rohingya and India – we are currently the only human rights organisation to do so for the Rohingya APPG.
  • We have also advocated and provided policy advice to the European Parliament and the US Congress on various human rights and humanitarian policies.
  • Over 60 international academic presentations, lectures, conferences and seminars including: Colombia University, Berkeley University of California, Panjab University, Universiti Malaya, Kings College London, University of Dhaka, New York University, Queen Mary University of London, Edinburgh University, Southampton University and many more.

Assam & Wider India Citizenship Rights

India has been embroiled in protests since December 2019, when Parliament passed a bill amending the country’s citizenship law. The National Register of Citizens (NRC) excluded 1.9 million people from citizenship in Assam alone. This poses a risk of mass deprivation of nationality and arbitrary detention of linguistic and religious minorities and is a clear violation of Article 15 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, that provides that "everyone has the right to a nationality" and that "no one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality."

  • We work with local activists, academics, committees, lawyers and organisations on the ground.
  • Mobilising students and academics to help widen understanding and raise much needed awareness.
  • We work directly with those affected by the NRC. Together with support from affected communities we devised an international campaign.
  • Working with human rights defenders to ensure that freedom of democracy and the democratic process are widely available to all across the region.
  • Ensuring that all cases of xenophobia, intimidation and abuse of those deemed as ‘foreigners’ are reported and perpetrators held to account.

Farmer Suicide & Agrarianism in Punjab, India

Punjab was once the most prosperous state in India. Now it is drained and crippled by corruption, exploitation and wider neglect. It was once the flagship of agrarian modernisation and the land of abundance, and now it is where India’s agrarian crisis is most acute; manifest in the continuation of civil unrest and farmer suicides amidst spiralling debt and a falling water table. The project seeks to understand and advocate on behalf of the farmers' concerns against state and Central Government. Often survivor families of farmers who have committed suicide struggle with the very basic elements of life – our project seeks to fill that gap, offer hope through education and livelihood for the families and to ensure that they have legal rights of protection.

  • The prevention of farmer suicide, the rights of farmers (land ownership, understanding of changing legislations which will directly impact them), and the livelihoods and security of the families of farmers who have committed suicide (especially the women and children) is our primary concern for this agrarian project.
  • We are currently working with farmers associations and academic institutions in India to raise more awareness and cultivate an interest in the rights and lives of this community.
  • Protecting farmers and their families who are threatened by money-lenders and loan sharks and also advocating for Government loan conditions to be fair.
  • Working with local and Central government to advocate for the safe and fair use of Punjab’s natural river water and resources. Over the last generation, Government decisions have led to river water from Punjab being siphoned off to other neighbouring states. Consequently, these decisions have adversely affected the livelihoods of farms and communities across Punjab leading to various social maladies.

Ala Kachuu and Women’s Rights, Kyrgyzstan

Non-consensual Ala Kachuu is the practice of bride kidnapping. Once a romantic, playful tradition in which two consenting adults would role-play as the groom ‘took away’ his bride, over time this tradition mutated into actual kidnap. The victims, outside of the severe trauma of the experience itself, can suffer sexual abuse, domestic violence and intimidation in their marital home. This has come about due to various socio-economic reasons.

  • We have successfully lobbied the government to enforce laws against the practice.
  • Partnered with Kyrgyz women’s rights organisations to help provide counselling and support to victims, working with women and girls of all ages.
  • Created literature and programmes for academic institutions to widen the understanding of the human rights abuses that stem from this practice.
  • Produced a national TV campaign and advertisement with the partnership of Kyrgyzstan’s leading film directors. This helped raise awareness of the horrors of bride kidnapping, which directly influenced legislation on women’s rights.

Get Newsletter

Urgent Appeal

ROHINGYA CORONAVIRUS EMERGENCY

Event